Music AS Therapy, or Music IN Therapy?

There are questions we are tired of debating, such as the endless query into nature vs. nurture, art or science, etc. These theoretical divides always seem to be resolved through compromise. At the superficial level, they’re exhausted. But with foundational knowledge and enough curiosity to explore deeper, they may forever challenge our assumptions, heighten our awareness, and lead to new insights. Treatment for maladaptive attributes, behaviors, feelings, abilities, etc. may vary depending on assumptions about their genetic or environmental etiology, and our ability to produce change. That is important. Valuing the training and skills required to practice the art of therapy, yet maintaining an objective, scientific approach, will make an efficacious, well-balanced clinician. That is important. Finally, we must learn when, why, and how to use music itself as a form of therapy, as well as when to apply music as part of a larger treatment approach. So continue to ask yourself, when, why, and how is music applied AS therapy? When, why, and how is music applied IN therapy? Can you explore rationales? Examples? Research? That is important.

 

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Five Moral Concerns

“Haidt, Graham, and Brian Nosek have defined five moral concerns. There is the fairness/reciprocity concern, involving issues of equal and unequal treatment. There is the harm/care concern, which includes things like empathy and concern for the suffering of others. There is an authority/respect concern. Human societies have their own hierarchies, and react with moral outrage when that which they view with reverence (including themselves) is not treated with proper respect. There is a purity/disgust concern. The disgust module may have first developed to repel us from noxious or unsafe food, but it evolved to have a moral component… Finally, and most problematically, there is the in-group/loyalty concern.” -David Brooks

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SOP 02: What is Music Therapy? What is a Music Therapist?

Music therapy is defined as the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals for people of all ages and ability levels within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.” A music therapist is defined as, “an individual who has completed the education and clinical training requirements established by the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) and who holds current board certification from The Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT).”

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Music Therapy!

Thank you #FLMusicTherapy task force for this great #mtadvocacy video! Quoted from the YouTube posting: “Board Certified Music Therapists (MT-BC) along with clients, supervisors, facility partners, families, and other community members are advocating for state recognition of the MT-BC credential through the form of a music therapy registry. Currently under review by the Florida House of Representatives (House Bill 571) and Senate (Senate Bill 204), music therapy registry would protect clients from harm that can occur, intentionally or not, when untrained professionals use music interventions with a variety of populations. This also has the potential to increase client access to services through grants and other funding through the state and local government. Finally, the registry will ensure that all board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) will have to be listed on the Florida registry before providing music therapy services across the state.

“To learn more about music therapy, for help contacting your legislators, or for any other questions please contact the Florida Music Therapy Task Force at FLMusicTherapyTF@gmail.com
Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @FLMTTaskForce
Visit us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/FLMTGovRel

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SB 204 / HB 571 #FLMusicTherapy

What is Music Therapy, and what is #FLMusicTherapy week? Why is Florida filing for a Music Therapy Registry? What will the new Registry look like?

Music Therapy

Music Therapy (MT) is an allied healthcare profession serving the unique needs of individuals with a wide range of skills and abilities, needs and limitations. Music therapists use music and a therapeutic relationship as tools to accomplish non-musical, clinical objectives for the young, adult, and elderly across social, emotional, cognitive, and physical domains of wellbeing. We are highly trained therapists working in special education, neuromuscular rehab, general medical, skilled nursing, end-of-life care, and much, much more.

What does NOT distinguish our field are the diverse clients we work with or the individualized objectives we help them to accomplish. Indeed, we collaborate with (and work towards similar goals as) speech therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, school teachers, medical doctors, and other professionals as part of an interdisciplinary treatment team. What DOES distinguish MT is the research-based application of music through a therapeutic relationship with a board-certified professional. Although you may be a brilliant musician with good intentions, you can not provide music therapy, just like an expert runner can not practice physical therapy.

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Intention versus Function

The issue of intention versus function is important for many aspects of our lives. It is the effect of certain actions that determine important aspects of human behavior. Knowledge of intentions may help us assess responsibility, and this knowledge may also help us to “understand.” It may even provide the rationale for our “judgement,” yet the effect of the previous behavior is still the same; it has already happened and cannot be undone. We must learn to make our every action thoughtful, meaningful, and equal with its intent (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 3).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Résumé… or Eulogy?

David Brooks, a well-known author and cultural/political commentator, powerfully asks, “Should you live for your résumé… or your eulogy?” This brief TED talk elaborates on the qualities and merits of both résumé and eulogy virtues. Which aspects of each do you prioritize, and how do you find a balance? What success is possible when you build on your strengths, and what benefits only arise from confronting your shortcomings?

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What Humans Need Most

“Above all the other necessities of human nature, above the satisfaction of any other need, above hunger, love, pleasure, fame, – even life itself – what a man needs most is the conviction that he is contained within the discipline of an ordered existence.” -Walter Lippmann

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Profile: Jenn Manno, MM, MT-BC, NICU-MT

“I currently live in East Windsor, NJ. I graduated from Immaculata University with a dual degree of a BA in Music and a BM in Music Therapy and began working for a private practice shortly after graduation. In 2013 I completed a Masters from Florida State University in Music Therapy with a specialty NICU certification. Most of my clinical experience has been in hospitals, medical daycares, early intervention, and school settings. I currently have contracts with New Jersey Pediatric Feeding Associates (NJPFA) and Sensory Playground, an occupational clinic. At these facilities I provide music therapy to assist young clients with sensory needs to food or other stimuli, body regulation, communication needs, oral motor needs, and behavioral issues. I am devoted to providing treatment that elicits positive responses. 

“I am currently an independent contractor. I do this because there seem to be few jobs full time with children, which is the population I enjoy working with. Being a contractor can be frustrating, it takes hard work, flexibility, and willingness to try anything to make things happen. Unfortunately, the funding is not always there for children with special needs and most families are paying out of pocket for services, but I continue to work with parents and families because that is where the need is. I believe the earlier the intervention, the better the outcome. These children learn to function more independently with musical interventions, that is why I do what I do. Seeing a child light up when something clicks is wonderful, seeing the look on the parents’ faces when they watch their child do it, is even better.

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