Who Decides Who Decides

It is difficult to decide which values to teach, but it is not nearly as difficult as knowing who decides who decides which values. Probably almost all of our ‘acculturating process’ actually represents the imposition of values; these values come from many potentially contradictory sources of reinforcement from various spheres of behavioral influence, be they home, school, other social institutions, peers, or elsewhere, but the student also possesses abilities to learn discrimination and therefore behave differently under different conditions. Many would say that ethically teachers are responsible for much of the student’s behavior and instilling within each child the selected best from the cultural heritage in order that, following school, the young adult will function productively. Most teachers decide that they truly want their students to be able to make decisions for themselves. If a teacher states precisely what power resides with the teacher and what decisions rest with the student, perhaps the student will continuously strive to earn more privileges rather than to feel sorry for him/herself by not being permitted to do something (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 26).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Smile, Laugh, and Sing the Music!

Here’s an upbeat, catchy, easy-to-learn song for spelling, identifying emotions, and learning about coping skills. Inspired by Wee Sing, “Smile, Laugh, and Sing the Music” is piggybacked to “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Children practice their letters, or practice spelling smile, laugh, and music. Smiling and laughter are signs of happiness, but the MT-BC might use this song to discuss a wide range of emotions; behavioral signs of sad or difficult emotions might be taught to inspire coping skills. Labelling and gaining insights into what you’re feeling is an important first lesson, then followed by learning positive ways of handling such situations. Discuss and practice talking with an adult and other coping skills, but also including smiling, laughing, and singing!

Below are the lyrics, which you can sing in any key, and available for free download is a bright PDF if you would like a visual aid to help clients spell each of the words.

Smile, Laugh, And Sing the Music!

1) Oh, it isn’t any trouble just to S-M-I-L-E! No, it isn’t any trouble just to S-M-I-L-E! So smile when you’re in trouble it will vanish like a bubble, If you’ll only take the trouble just to S-M-I-L-E!

Chorus) Smile, laugh, and sing the music! Smile, laugh, and sing the music! Smile, laugh, and sing the music, the music makes you strong!

2) It isn’t any trouble just to L-A-U-G-H…   Repeat Chorus

3) It isn’t any trouble to sing M-U-S-I-C…   Repeat Chorus

Download the colorful visual aide below to help with spelling. Suggested page transitions are indicated by the number in the version of the lyrics beneath the FREE download.


Smile, Laugh, And Sing the Music! (With PDF Page Numbers)

(1) Oh, it isn’t any trouble just to S-M-I-L-E! No, it isn’t any trouble just to S-M-I-L-E! So (2) smile when you’re in trouble it will vanish like a bubble, If you’ll only take the trouble just to (3) S-M-I-L-E!

(Chorus, put PDF down out of sight) Smile, laugh, and sing the music! Smile, laugh, and sing the music! Smile, laugh, and sing the music, the music makes you strong!

(4) Oh, it isn’t any trouble just to L-A-U-G-H! No, it isn’t any trouble just to L-A-U-G-H! So (5) laugh when you’re in trouble it will vanish like a bubble, If you’ll only take the trouble just to (6) L-A-U-G-H!  Repeat Chorus with PDF down

(7) Oh, it isn’t any trouble to sing M-U-S-I-C! No, it isn’t any trouble to sing M-U-S-I-C! So (8) sing when you’re in trouble it will vanish like a bubble, If you’ll only take the trouble to sing (9) M-U-S-I-C!  Repeat Chorus with PDF down

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

SOP 11: Education and Clinical Training Requirements

“A qualified music therapist must have graduated with a bachelor’s degree (or its equivalent) or higher from a music therapy degree program approved by the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA), and must have successfully completed a minimum of 1,200 hours of supervised clinical work through pre-internship training at the AMTA-approved degree program, and internship training through AMTA–approved National Roster or University Affiliated internship programs, or an equivalent. Upon successful completion of the AMTA academic and clinical training requirements or its international equivalent, an individual is eligible to sit for the national board certification exam administered by the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT).”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Power

Power, by whatever name, is one of the most problematic of all behavioral interactions. We often euphemize power as we talk about responsibility, duty, or rights, or we just pretend that power does not actually exist. We will even ‘manipulate’ students into doing something that they do not think about: “Would you like to put your materials away before lunch?” It would appear that most of what we just assume to be the correct thing to do represents the imposition of our own values on the student (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 26).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

May 2016

May is the third and final month of spring. This month we celebrate two of the populations music therapists serve; May is Older Americans and National Mental Health Awareness Month. May also seems to be a month of good health: Physical Fitness and Sports, Better Hearing and Speech, Better Sleep, Correct Posture, and Healthy Vision. Days and months are dedicated to so many causes, sometimes bizarre and humorous, but one more that I’d like to share is that May is Personal History Awareness Month. The first week of May is National Small Business Week and Public Service Recognition Week. Among our themed holidays that can inspire original songs and creative session plans, May offers us the opportunity to value our teachers, nurses, mothers, brothers, and armed forces. For a much longer list of observations, click here. We are familiar with Cinco de Mayo and Memorial Day, but here are a few other holidays and events to get excited about:

05/01/16 “May Day” is also Mother Goose Day

05/03/16 National Teacher Day (And Teacher Appreciation Week)

05/05/16 Cinco de Mayo

05/06/16 National Nurses Day; Space Day

05/07/16 Kentucky Derby

05/08/16 Mother’s Day

05/11/16 National School Nurse Day

05/12/16 International Nurses Day

05/18/16 International Museum Day; Visit Your Relatives Day

05/19/16 Circus Day

05/21/16 Armed Forces Day; American Red Cross was founded this day in 1881

05/22/16 Buy A Musical Instrument Day

05/22/16 National Brother Day

05/30/16 Memorial Day

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail