Acting One’s Way Into A New Way Of Thinking

While serious long-term depression should be handled by a professional, worry, anger, and other responses are expected in human beings of all ages. They might be acknowledged immediately, not reinforced or worried about, and followed by behavioral techniques to actively change the emotion. Whereas “worry” or “depression” usually represent nothing more than statements to oneself or others indicating that we “feel sorry for ourselves” and, as such are definitely unproductive, the focus becomes one of solving the problems that have produced the worry, anger, or crying (depression), and acting one’s way into a new way of thinking. It is astounding how fast “worry” and “depression” are relieved when no one pays attention and the negative verbal behavior is either punished or ignored while positive solutions are praised. “Tell me what you intend to do; do not give me your problem.” “Is that what you will do next time? That’s excellent. Let’s pretend that I’m the other person and you show me what you will do” (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 9).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Learned Relationships

We discipline to provide for social order and individual productivity. Within the complexity of many responses to the external environment, we must structure the external world to provide proper relationships to be learned. Whenever these learned relationships to external stimuli are conducive to productive ends, the student will have a repertoire of responses that will serve them well when meeting the constant challenges of life (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 7).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Discipline

Discipline is a process whereby certain relationships (cause-and-effect associations) are established. It is a way of behaving, conducive to productive ends. First, it must be taught (through consistency and contingencies); secondly, it must be learned (i.e., internalized) (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 5).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Intention versus Function

The issue of intention versus function is important for many aspects of our lives. It is the effect of certain actions that determine important aspects of human behavior. Knowledge of intentions may help us assess responsibility, and this knowledge may also help us to “understand.” It may even provide the rationale for our “judgement,” yet the effect of the previous behavior is still the same; it has already happened and cannot be undone. We must learn to make our every action thoughtful, meaningful, and equal with its intent (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 3).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Teaching

Motivate the students, captivate their interests, recognize individual differences. Don’t give up. Discipline (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 1).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Transfer

“Bear in mind that we all are teachers, we all are students, and that to ‘Transfer’ is the process of moving an object, symbol, or idea from one closed system to another, when the two systems contain similar aspects or some similar relationship, yet retaining a similar meaning” (Madsen & Moore, 1978, p. 5).

Madsen, C. K. & Moore, R. S. (1978). Experimental Research in Music: Workbook in Design and Statistical Tests. Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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