The Present

At any time in the chronological development of a child, we are prone to look back into the child’s history to explain their present behavior. Many teachers quickly abdicate responsibility once history is known, but they hold the responsibility to discipline. A long involved analysis of the child’s many antecedent events (reinforcement history) rather than to focus on the manipulation and control of the present environment is generally both unproductive and unnecessary. During the very first processes of interacting with the child, the teacher should be able to find out just where the student is both socially and academically and assess the extent of any specific problems (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 18).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Role-Playing

We should teach ourselves and our students specific actions to deal with foreseeable emergencies with extensive role-playing. Correct responses may then be based on specified and practiced values and techniques, practiced and learned in advance (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 9).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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“Best Learning Rhythm”

“Learning consists of taking things that are strange and unnatural, such as reading and algebra, and absorbing them so steadily that they become automatic. That frees up the conscious mind to work on new things. Alfred North Whitehead saw this learning process as a principle of progress: ‘Civilization advances by extending the number of operations which we can perform without thinking about them.’

Automaticity is achieved through repetition… It is far better to go over material for a little bit, repetitively, on five consecutive nights than it is to cram in one long session the night before an exam.

“Ms. Taylor wanted Harold to slip back into the best learning rhythm. A child in a playroom instinctively understands how to explore. She starts with Mom, and then ventures forth in search of new toys. She returns to Mom for security and then repeats her ventures forth. Then it’s back to Mom and out again to explore.

“The same principle applies to learning in high school and beyond. It is a process of what Richard Ogle, the author of Smart World, calls reach and reciprocity. Start with the core knowledge in the field, then venture out and learn something new. Then come back and reintegrate the new morsel with what you already know. Then venture out again. Then return. Back and forth. Again and again. As Ogle argues, too much reciprocity and you wind up in an insular rut. Too much reach and your efforts are scattershot and fruitless. Ms. Taylor wanted to slip Harold into this rhythm of expansion and integration.”

Brooks, D. (2011). The social animal: The hidden sources of love, character, and achievement (p. 87). New York, NY: Random House, Inc.

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Acting One’s Way Into A New Way Of Thinking

While serious long-term depression should be handled by a professional, worry, anger, and other responses are expected in human beings of all ages. They might be acknowledged immediately, not reinforced or worried about, and followed by behavioral techniques to actively change the emotion. Whereas “worry” or “depression” usually represent nothing more than statements to oneself or others indicating that we “feel sorry for ourselves” and, as such are definitely unproductive, the focus becomes one of solving the problems that have produced the worry, anger, or crying (depression), and acting one’s way into a new way of thinking. It is astounding how fast “worry” and “depression” are relieved when no one pays attention and the negative verbal behavior is either punished or ignored while positive solutions are praised. “Tell me what you intend to do; do not give me your problem.” “Is that what you will do next time? That’s excellent. Let’s pretend that I’m the other person and you show me what you will do” (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 9).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Shout-Out! Tips for Behavior Modification-Music Therapy Style!

Shout-Out! In her recent article, “Tips for Behavior Modification-Music Therapy Style!“, Laura Theismann, MT-BC shares common problem behaviors and some successful behavior modification strategies. Problem behaviors include poor listening and cooperation, inappropriate verbalizations, lack of attention, and general off-task behaviors. Some strategies include a token economy, counting system, a contingent “check system,” and topical songs.

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Learned Relationships

We discipline to provide for social order and individual productivity. Within the complexity of many responses to the external environment, we must structure the external world to provide proper relationships to be learned. Whenever these learned relationships to external stimuli are conducive to productive ends, the student will have a repertoire of responses that will serve them well when meeting the constant challenges of life (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 7).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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