Music for CPR

When heart attacks or other emergencies occur, it is important to respond quickly.  Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can support the flow of oxygenated blood across the body until medical care arrives.  CPR emphasizes chest compressions at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2012).  Healthcare providers are encouraged to use conventional CPR according to their updated training, received about once every two years (AHA & ASA, 2014). You can find an online course or local training center here.

Anecdotal experience has suggested that the use of music as a mental metronome can improve CPR compression rates.  Researchers selected “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees which has an appropriate 103 bpm (and a perfect name), measured compression rates while medical providers listened to the song, then measured rates again at least five weeks later when participants were encouraged to use the song only as a musical memory aid.  All participants in both the first (x̅ = 109.1 bpm) and second (x̅ = 113.2 bpm) assessments maintained compression rates safely over 100 bpm.  Participants also reported that the music increased their confidence and technical ability to perform CPR (Hafner, Sturgell, Matlock, Bockewitz, & Barker, 2012; Matlock, Hafner, Bockewitz, Barker, & Dewar, 2008).  Disco music in general has a strong, steady tempo.  My most recent training featured Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust,” which is thematically ironic but rhythmically effective (e.g., Aleccia, 2008). Enjoy some lifesaving songs below!


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Shout-Out! Music Therapy and Premature Infants

Melissa Sorensen of the George Center, Inc. explains how music therapy helps premature babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) meet their medical goals: to gain weight, learn feeding behaviors, and adapt to the environment out of the womb without being overstimulated. Read more about multimodal neurological enhancement (MNE) and the Pacifier-Activated Lullaby (PAL) by checking out her blog post here: http://www.thegeorgecenter.com/2016/03/18/music-therapy-and-premature-infants/

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Music Therapy and Medicine, by AMTA

“Music therapy has been shown to be an efficacious and valid treatment option for medical patients with a variety of diagnoses. Music therapy can be used to address patient needs related to respiration, chronic pain, physical rehabilitation, diabetes, headaches, cardiac conditions, surgery, and obstetrics, among others. Research results and clinical experiences attest to the viability of music therapy even in those patients resistant to other treatment approaches. Music is a form of sensory stimulation, which provokes responses due to the familiarity, predictability, and feelings of security associated with it.”

Learn where music therapists work across medical settings, what training is required in order to provide music activities towards targeting clinical objectives, and how the service benefits medical patients and health care staff. READ MORE: http://www.musictherapy.org/assets/1/7/MT_Medicine_2006.pdf.

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