Motivation

Some students must be taught motivation, curiosity, or interest, that is, to establish their own goals. No thinking adult wastes time in idle pursuits that are difficult and meaningless. How can the teacher expect everyone automatically to want to learn, especially when it may represent work? The rewards of learning must be fully established (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 24).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Values-Techniques Differentiation

After questions relating to important value choices have been answered, effective techniques may then be used to enhance learning. It is important to discriminate between the values and the techniques. Many values (implicit or explicit) are reinforced by teachers without clear values-techniques differentiation. Of course, the choice of a particular technique represents a value choice itself. It also seems apparent that no teaching technique can be effectively divorced from the person who uses it. Effective methods, much like any human product (e.g., atomic energy, jet propulsion, governments), may be used either to the benefit or detriment of other human beings. Effective teaching is that which implements selected values. (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 13) Behavior modification is the application of those techniques used for implementing values (p. 34).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Learned Relationships

We discipline to provide for social order and individual productivity. Within the complexity of many responses to the external environment, we must structure the external world to provide proper relationships to be learned. Whenever these learned relationships to external stimuli are conducive to productive ends, the student will have a repertoire of responses that will serve them well when meeting the constant challenges of life (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 7).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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Teaching For Independence

“Ms. Taylor wanted to impart knowledge, the sort of stuff that shows up on tests. But within weeks, students forget 90 percent of the knowledge they learn in class anyway. The only point of being a teacher is to do more then impart facts; it’s to shape the way students perceive the world, to help a student absorb the rules of a discipline. The teachers who do that get remembered.

“She didn’t so much teach them as apprentice them. Much unconscious learning is done through imitation. She exhibited a way of thinking through a problem and then hoped her students participated along with her.

“She forced them to make mistakes. The pain of getting things wrong and the effort required to overcome error creates an emotional experience that helps burn things into the mind.

“She tried to get students to interrogate their own unconscious opinions. Making up your mind, she believed, is not like building a wall. It’s more a process of discovering the idea that already exists unconsciously. She wanted kids to try on different intellectual costumes to see what fit.

“She also forced them to work. For all her sentimentality, she did not believe in the notion that students should just follow their natural curiosity. She gave them homework assignments they did not want to do. She gave them frequent tests, intuitively sensing that the act of retrieving knowledge for a test strengthens the relevant networks in the brain. She was willing to be hated.

“Ms. Taylor’s goal was to turn her students into autodidacts. She hoped to give her students a taste of the emotional and sensual pleasure discovery brings – the jolt of pleasure you get when you work hard, suffer a bit, and then something clicks. She hoped her students would become addicted to this process. They would become, thanks to her, self-teachers for the rest of their days. That was the grandiosity with which Ms. Taylor conceived of her craft.”

Brooks, D. (2011). The social animal: The hidden sources of love, character, and achievement (pp. 82-83). New York, NY: Random House, Inc.

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Teaching

Motivate the students, captivate their interests, recognize individual differences. Don’t give up. Discipline (Madsen & Madsen, 1998, p. 1).

Madsen, C. K. & Madsen, C. H. (1998). Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach For Educational Development. (4th ed.) Raleigh, NC: Contemporary Publishing Company of Raleigh, Inc.

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