Music Therapy Activities Wikia

MusicTherapyActivities.Wikia.com

When Music Therapy St. Pete, LLC’s founder, James E. Riley, was conducting his master’s degree and working with a large interdisciplinary team at a regional psychiatric hospital, he led a dedicated team to build a community resource for all board-certified music therapists (MT-BCs) and anyone else interested in music therapy. The website Music Therapy Activities Wikia (MTAW) is a free, online resource designed to be community driven and open-sourced; MTAW encourages everyone to contribute what they can offer (editorial administration ensures the accuracy of content) so as to bring together multiple perspectives, original ideas, experienced tips, and excellent resources. It is an “encyclopedic collection of therapeutic music activities, indexed by Goal/ObjectivePopulation, and Use of Music.”

MusicTherapyActivities.Wikia.com was featured in a post on Psychology Today, written by Cathy Malchiodi PhD, LPCC, LPAT, ATR-BC, REAT. MTAW has been featured in regional and national presentations. It has been on social media and music therapy blogs. It’s definitely been on my Bookmarks bar and frequently referenced for new session ideas, holidays songs, iPad apps, songs for lyric analysis, and sooooo much more. Follow-up posts will further discuss everything the site offers.

So for everything this site can offer, what does it need?! Well, it needs YOU. This site is just beginning. It’s very young. The structure has been provided, but the content will continue to grow. People are searching through its pages, but we need you to take just a few moments to learn how easy it is to edit – or contribute new – material! It feels good. You’re already planning your own sessions, so share the love! Do your good deed for the day! Website managers can even collaborate with internship directors or university faculty to provide reports, allowing MTAW editing a class grade or intern project!

For any questions, ideas, or concerns becoming an active part of our music therapy activity/information sharing community, please reach out to james@mtstpete.org. THANK YOU!

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Shout-Out! “All Children Love Music!” MT w/SLP

“’Hello, hello! I see you there in the green shirt, the green shirt, won’t you please tell us your name?’ A child looks down to check before opening her eyes wide and pointing to her own shirt. The Music Therapist – Board Certified (MT-BC) responds, ‘That’s you! Welcome! Everyone say hi to Sarah!’ Several shy children whisper their greetings and make brief eye contact. A father helps his toddler wave. An older child turns to shake Sarah’s hand and pronounces, ‘Hello!!! I’m Gaawry!!!’ The MT-BC smiles, then challenges everyone to repeat the shirt’s color “green” before giving each child their own turn.

“Next, the group sings, ‘Music sweet music, all children love music! We work real hard and have great fun, we know it’s therapeutic!’ Every Tuesday morning and afternoon on the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital’s outpatient Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) floor, children with speech and communication delays achieve non-musical benefits through music therapy groups. These fun and innovative clinical services are funded by donations to Music Sweet Music, Inc. ‘Great singing! Let’s practice that big word, ‘therapeutic.’ Stick your tongue out a little and try it again. Yes! Timmy, that was great a ‘th’ sound when you sang the word ‘therapeutic’!’

“Before singing our ABCs or drumming today’s activities, before sharing instruments or labeling our emotions, we’ve already shown off our social skills, articulated several target sounds, demonstrated new confidence, and engaged successfully in a clinical environment. We have connected on an individual basis through music; the children are motivated to engage in SLP interventions without realizing how hard they’re working.

“Whereas the children love the music, their families value the therapy. Music therapy is the clinical application of music, evidence-based interventions, and a unique therapeutic relationship in order to accomplish non-musical objectives.”

James E. Riley, MM, MT-BC provides Music Therapy across Pinellas country through Music Therapy St. Pete, LLC (MTSP) and Music Sweet Music, Inc. (MSM). MSM provides MT to families of the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital out-patient pediatric Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) program, and featured this blog post illustrating what a “normal” session might look like; continue reading here!

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History of Music Therapy

“The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century profession formally began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Veterans hospitals around the country to play for the thousands of veterans suffering both physical and emotional trauma from the wars. The patients’ notable physical and emotional responses to music led the doctors and nurses to request the hiring of musicians by the hospitals. It was soon evident that the hospital musicians needed some prior training before entering the facility and so the demand grew for a college curriculum.” Music therapy is now an established allied healthcare profession. Board-certified clinicians serve many community and healthcare populations through individualized, research-based treatments. To help you discover more, the American Music Therapy Association offers a short history, as well as a more detailed chronology of events from 1940 – 2010.

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SOP 10: Music Therapy Governing Bodies

Music therapy in America is governed by two separate organizations: the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) and the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT).

AMTA is our professional association responsible for establishing education and clinical training standards, supporting music therapy research, upholding ethical standards, educating the public about music therapy, and increasing access to quality music therapy services. Among many other initiatives to advance music therapy and support music therapists, AMTA organizes annual conferences and publishes the Journal of Music Therapy and Music Therapy Perspectives.

CBMT is an “Independent, non-profit, certifying agency fully accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA).” “The purpose of board certification in music therapy is to provide an objective national standard that can be used as a measure of professionalism and competence by interested agencies, groups, and individuals. The MT-BC credential may also be required to meet state laws and regulations.” CBMT is responsible for assessing the knowledge required for safe and competent practice, for issuing the music therapist credentials of Music Therapist – Board Certified (MT-BC), and for maintaining high standards of continuing education or recertification.

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NCCIH Features MT for ASD

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) specifically featured Music Therapy (MT) to benefit individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in their April 2016 Clinical Digest: “The existing evidence base indicates that melatonin may be beneficial for sleep disorders associated with ASD. Music therapy may have a positive effect on social interaction, and communication and behavioral skills in those affected by ASDs. However, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether other complementary health approaches such as modified diets, supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids or vitamin B6, or chelation are efficacious for ASD symptoms” (NCCIH, 2016).

The e-newsletter compares the evidence-base, efficacy, and safety of common approaches to help those with ASD. Evidence for MT’s efficacy is attributed to the 2014 Cochrane review (Geretsegger, M., Elefant, C., Mössler, K.A., & Gold, C., 2014) “of 10 studies involving a total of 165 children with ASD found that music therapy was superior to “placebo” therapy or standard care for social interaction, non-verbal and verbal communication skills, initiating behavior, and social-emotional reciprocity. The review concluded that music therapy may help children with ASD to improve their skills in areas such as social interaction and communication, and may also contribute to increasing social adaptation skills in children with ASD and to promoting the quality of parent-child relationships” (NCCIH, 2016).

Geretsegger, M., Elefant, C., Mössler, K.A., & Gold, C. (2014). Music therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD004381. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004381.pub3

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). (April 2016). Autism Spectrum Disorder and Complementary Health Approaches. Retrieved from https://nccih.nih.gov/health/providers/digest/autism-spectrum-disorder

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Shout-Out! Music Therapy and Premature Infants

Melissa Sorensen of the George Center, Inc. explains how music therapy helps premature babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) meet their medical goals: to gain weight, learn feeding behaviors, and adapt to the environment out of the womb without being overstimulated. Read more about multimodal neurological enhancement (MNE) and the Pacifier-Activated Lullaby (PAL) by checking out her blog post here: http://www.thegeorgecenter.com/2016/03/18/music-therapy-and-premature-infants/

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Music Therapy and Medicine, by AMTA

“Music therapy has been shown to be an efficacious and valid treatment option for medical patients with a variety of diagnoses. Music therapy can be used to address patient needs related to respiration, chronic pain, physical rehabilitation, diabetes, headaches, cardiac conditions, surgery, and obstetrics, among others. Research results and clinical experiences attest to the viability of music therapy even in those patients resistant to other treatment approaches. Music is a form of sensory stimulation, which provokes responses due to the familiarity, predictability, and feelings of security associated with it.”

Learn where music therapists work across medical settings, what training is required in order to provide music activities towards targeting clinical objectives, and how the service benefits medical patients and health care staff. READ MORE: http://www.musictherapy.org/assets/1/7/MT_Medicine_2006.pdf.

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Music Therapy in Community Hospice

“This is Merry, an intern in our music therapy program, visiting one of our patients, Neomia. These two developed a special bond over their shared love of music. When this video was taken, Neomia had been nonresponsive for a few days. Watch what happens when Merry sings, “Precious Lord, Take My Hand.” It was one of Neomia’s favorites. They sang it in every session.

“Music has the power to soothe, heal and connect us all. How has music connected you to those you love? Share your experience with us.”

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Shout-Out! New Jersey’s “Music Therapy Clinician” Journal

MTClinician

The New Jersey Association for Music Therapy has begun a really exciting initiative; available for free online is their peer-edited, open access, “journal-zine” called the Music Therapy Clinician. Check out their premier publication here, and given time, you will be able to access future volumes here. For more frequent updates, you might also like their Facebook page or follow them on Twitter.

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Shout-Out! Tips for Behavior Modification-Music Therapy Style!

Shout-Out! In her recent article, “Tips for Behavior Modification-Music Therapy Style!“, Laura Theismann, MT-BC shares common problem behaviors and some successful behavior modification strategies. Problem behaviors include poor listening and cooperation, inappropriate verbalizations, lack of attention, and general off-task behaviors. Some strategies include a token economy, counting system, a contingent “check system,” and topical songs.

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